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Seven-Time Emmy® Winner, Charles "Bud" Ford dies at 92

CHARLES EDWARD "BUD" FORD, JR. passed away at the age of 92 on May 23, 2019. He was born in Montesano, Washington on May 18, 1927 to Charles E. Ford and Dorothy (McDermont) Ford. Bud grew up in Seattle and Spokane, WA. When Bud was 17, he enlisted in the Army. Due to his linguistic ability he was trained to speak Japanese at the University of Minnesota and Yale University and became an interpreter during and following World War II. Bud was assigned duty in Japan weeks after the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. He supervised the construction of two radio stations in Sasebo, Japan for Armed Forces Radio.

After the war, Bud earned his degree in Speech at Washington State University and attended graduate school in Broadcasting at Northwestern University. In 1950, Bud moved to Cleveland to work for the NBC radio network and TV as a writer, director and producer. There he met his loving wife of 47 years, Terese (Terry) J. Trivison, who passed away in 2002. In 1955, Bud and Terry moved to New York City where Bud worked at WNBC as producer/director. In 1962, he was appointed Director of Operations for WJZ-TV in Baltimore, MD. Returning to Cleveland in 1967, Bud became General Manager and partner in the multi-media company Visual Techniques. In 1972 he joined Meldrum & Campbell Advertising (later merged into Marcus Advertising) as Director of Radio/TV where he produced "Academic Challenge" and "Cash Explosion." His various commercials earned seven Emmy Awards. In 1986 Bud was elected to the Cleveland Board of Governors of The National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences (NATAS) and served in many positions nationally and for the Cleveland chapter. He was inducted into the NATAS Silver Circle in 1996 and the Gold Circle in 2005.

Bud dedicated his life to serving others, particularly at his Church (Gesu) where he was an usher, sacristan, lector, Eucharistic Minister, Scoutmaster and track coach among other ministries. Bud also volunteered at the Cleveland Play House where he and Terry cooked meals for the actors and were members of the Men's and Women's Committees. He was honored as the Volunteer of the Year in 2005. One of Bud's greatest loves throughout his life was the Boy Scouts. He became an Eagle Scout in 1942. He received the Distinguished Eagle Award in 2014 in recognition of his professional achievements and exemplary volunteer leadership service to his community. He served in numerous positions at the Troop, District and Council level in the former Greater Cleveland Council, including Scoutmaster at Gesu Church, the Executive Board and as Council Camping Chairman. He received the GCC Silver Beaver Award in 1990 and the St. George award in 2003 from the National Catholic Committee on Scouting. He was actively involved with the Tinnerman Canoe Base in Ontario, Canada and was Head Commissioner at Beaumont Reservation Scout Camp where he renovated buildings and assisted with summer camp programs even into his mid-80s!

Bud was a caring friend and neighbor to many and a devoted family man. His life was full of unwavering faith and demonstrated grace and love. He will be greatly missed and was an inspiration to all. He was a wonderful husband to his late wife, Terry, a loving father of Anne Marie (Tom) Blank, Timothy C. (Lori) Ford, Michael R. (Anne Elizabeth) Ford, Mary Ellen (Greg) Keller, and John D. (deceased). Devoted grandfather to Jeffrey (Elana), Peter (Kellie) and Kevin Blank, Rebecca Douglass, Andrew, Daniel, Elizabeth and Carolyn Ford. Dearest brother to the late Richard D. Ford (Nancy) and brother-in-law to Leanne R. Trivison, Dominic (Joan) Trivison and Lorrie (deceased) (John) Robbins. Son-in-law of the late Betty and Domenic Trivison.

Friends received at THE SCHULTE & MAHON-MURPHY FUNERAL HOME, 5252 MAYFIELD RD., LYNDHURST (BETWEEN RICHMOND AND BRAINARD) SUNDAY, JUNE 2 FROM 2 – 6 P.M. Prayers Monday, June 3 at the Funeral Home at 9:15 A.M. followed by Mass of Christian Burial at Church of the Gesu, 2470 Miramar Blvd, University Hts. at 10 A.M. Burial will follow at Lake View Cemetery. A reception and celebration of Bud's life will be held in McAuley Hall at Gesu after the cemetery service. Special thanks to Bud's support group including family members, Scouters, Play House friends, special neighbors, the doctors at University Hospitals, the caregivers with Daughters with Degrees and the caring staff at Hospice of the Western Reserve, David Simpson Hospice House. Those wishing to make a memorial contribution are asked to consider the Lake Erie Council of the Boy Scouts of America, Church of the Gesu, or the Cleveland Play House. (ARRANGEMENTS BY ST. JOHN FUNERAL HOME OF BEDFORD 440-232-1155)

 

Featured CAB  Honoree: Tim Conway


Thomas Daniel Conway was born in Willoughby, Ohio. He attended Bowling Green State University, where he majored in speech and radio, and served in the Army. He started his career in show business working for a radio station, eventually writing for the promotional department. There was already an actor named Tom Conway, so he became Tim.

After his Army service ended, Conway returned to Cleveland to work with Ernie Anderson on KYW-TV in 1958-59 and on WJW-TV from 1960-62 on a weekday morning film showcase (under the Ernie’s Place banner). Conway wrote material for the comedic skits shown in the film intermissions. He also recorded a comedy album with Anderson.

Comedienne Rose Marie discovered Conway and arranged for him to audition for “The Steve Allen Plymouth Show”; Allen was so impressed with Conway that the comedian became a regular on the show in 1960. Conway was also a regular on Allen’s next series, “The New Steve Allen Show,” in 1961.

The following year he was signed to play Ensign Charles Parker on “McHale’s Navy” and the show aired over 4 seasons from 1962-1966.

After that he starred in ABC’s brief comic Western series “Rango” as the title character, a bumbling Texas Ranger, but the show ran for only 17 episodes in 1967. He got his own series in 1970, but CBS’ “The Tim Conway Show,” in which he played an inept pilot at a fly-by-night airline, lasted only a single season.

It was his hilarious work on “The Carol Burnett Show” — memorable decades later to those who watched the show, and immortalized on YouTube — that was his real gift to audiences. Some of his best work may have been as golfer Derk Dorf and his clueless caddy, Loenard.

“Leonard, why don’t you consider getting to bed a little early tonight? You wouldn’t want to miss a visit from the IQ fairy.” Dorf on Golf.


CAB Mission Statement

As a nonprofit  501c6 we work collaboratively as an industry to continue to advance excellence in broadcasting in Cleveland through education, social interaction, recognition and philanthropy.
  1. Promote the quality of broadcasting in the Cleveland area
  2. Provide a forum for issues concerning all segments of the Cleveland broadcasting community
  3. Foster greater understanding between those in the broadcasting sales, advertising and business communities
  4. Increase the level of professionalism among those in the Cleveland broadcast community
 


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